AP Computer Science Principles
June 25th, 2016 by Sutfin

Free

One student enrolled

What will this course teach you?

The pilot AP Computer Science Principles course is designed to teach you computational thinking and computing skills. This course will teach you how to think!

Additionally, you will gain an understanding of the real-world impact of computing applications and programming literacy.

AP Computer Science Principles is designed to also introduce to you the central tenets of computer science. This course focuses on the innovative aspects of computing as well as the computational thinking practices that helps students see how computing is relevant to many areas of their everyday lives.

You will learn the following in this course.

Computational Thinking Practices

  1. Connecting computing
  2. Creating computational artifacts
  3. Abstracting
  4. Analyzing problems and artifacts
  5. Communicating
  6. Collaborating

Big Ideas

  1. Creativity
  2. Abstraction
  3. Data and Information
  4. Algorithms
  5. Programming
  6. The Internet
  7. Global Impact

You will learn how to write instructions for the computer to perform a certain task. By learning to control the computer through a basic programming language, you will get the opportunity to develop skills that will enable you to deal with general issues on the computer – in any area.

Why do you have to “learn to program”, when you may never program again in your life? Programming is actually the simplest manner in which to deal with a computer. Comparably, other applications you use (Photoshop, Word, Facebook, Picasa, etc.) are much more complex.

We want you to start with a simpler model, one more in your control, to gain the basic understanding of how computers work. At the end of the term, you’ll then explore one application – Excel – to practice applying your new knowledge in a specific context. Then, in the future, no matter what new application you use, you can apply that knowledge to figuring it out and making it work for you.

How will you (and the teacher) know if you are making progress in your learning?

The course offers you a number of opportunities to get feedback on whether you are learning what you need to know. Learning computing isn’t done by reading about it. Moreover, we care more about your development of analysis and communication skills regarding computing than whether you can “just do it”. For each topic, you will be able to get practice and feedback in the following ways:

  • Exploratory modules and projects with on-line book: You will complete exploratory projects based on modules that guide you in understanding a topic by creating programs on the computer to get the basics down.
  • Guided Practice Assignments: The instructor, your classmates, and you will work on creating projects together in the computer lab based on the topic you are learning. This will reinforce the computing principle you are learning from the exploratory modules in the on-line book.
  • Independent Assignments Lab: You will be expected to demonstrate your mastery of the concepts from the on-line book modules by completing labs and projects. You are expected to come prepared to lab — having done the relevant exploratory projects and assignments and having engaged with and learned the material in lecture and on-line modules. You are expected to complete your lab during the session, but you will be able to get assistance from not only tutors, but your fellow students. Labs and projects will be posted in advance and you are encouraged to look over them before you come to lab.
  • Quizzes: At the beginning of lecture, you will take a quiz answering a few basic questions from the homework – this is your incentive read the on-line book to do the exploratory projects and provide feedback to you on whether you are ready to attend lecture.
  • Discussion Peer Instruction Questions: During lecture, you will deepen your understanding of computing concepts and develop technical analysis and communication skills by discussing challenging questions in a team of three students, guided by the instructor.
  • Technology and Society: You will be given various activities exploring issues on involving technology and society. These activities will require you to use discussion forums, Internet resource finding/analysis, and wiki development.
  • Midterm and Final: a midterm and final will be given in order for you to demonstrate mastery of the topics and concepts presented in class.

 

Reference

Blown to Bits

  • Unit 0: Introduction to Computer Science Principles 

    Eleven Instruction Days at 85 minutes (15 hours)

    0/12

    • Unit 0 Quiz
    • APCSP: 0.1
    • APCSP: 0.2
    • APCSP: 0.3
    • APCSP: 0.4
    • APCSP: 0.5
    • APCSP: 0.6
    • APCSP: 0.7
    • APCSP: 0.8
    • APCSP: 0.9
    • APCSP: 0.10
    • APCSP: 0.11
  • Unit 1: Telling and Dividing a Story (Methods) 

    Eleven Instruction Days at 85 minutes (15 hours)

    0/12

    • U1 Quiz
    • APCSP: 01.1
    • APCSP: 01.2
    • APCSP: 01.3
    • APCSP: 01.4
    • APCSP: 01.5
    • APCSP: 01.6
    • APCSP: 01.7
    • APCSP: 01.8
    • APCSP: 01.9
    • APCSP: 01.10
    • APCSP: 01.11
  • Unit 2: Behaving the Same vs Differently (Parameters) 

    Eleven Instruction Days at 85 minutes (15 hours)

    0/12

    • U2 Quiz
    • APCSP: 02.1
    • APCSP: 02.2
    • APCSP: 02.3
    • APCSP: 02.4
    • APCSP: 02.5
    • APCSP: 02.6
    • APCSP: 02.7
    • APCSP: 02.8
    • APCSP: 02.9
    • APCSP: 02.10
    • APCSP: 02.11
  • Unit 3: Get into the Story (Events) 

    Seven Instruction Days at 85 minutes (10 hours)

    0/8

    • U3 Quiz
    • APCSP: 03.1
    • APCSP: 03.2
    • APCSP: 03.3
    • APCSP: 03.4
    • APCSP: 03.5
    • APCSP: 03.6
    • APCSP: 03.7
  • Unit 4: The Internet and Binary Numbers 

    Nine Instruction Days at 85 minutes (12 hours)

    0/10

    • U4 Quiz
    • APCSP: 04.1
    • APCSP: 04.2
    • APCSP: 04.3
    • APCSP: 04.4
    • APCSP: 04.5
    • APCSP: 04.6
    • APCSP: 04.7
    • APCSP: 04.8
    • APCSP: 04.9
  • Unit 5: Mathematical Expressions and Functions 

    Eleven Instruction Days at 85 minutes (15 hours)

    0/12

    • U5 Quiz
    • APCSP: 05.1
    • APCSP: 05.2
    • APCSP: 05.3
    • APCSP: 05.4
    • APCSP: 05.5
    • APCSP: 05.6
    • APCSP: 05.7
    • APCSP: 05.8
    • APCSP: 05.9
    • APCSP: 05.10
    • APCSP: 05.11
  • Unit 6: Choose Your Path (If Statements) 

    Seven Instruction Days at 85 minutes (10 hours)

    0/8

    • U6 Quiz
    • APCSP: 06.1
    • APCSP: 06.2
    • APCSP: 06.3
    • APCSP: 06.4
    • APCSP: 06.5
    • APCSP: 06.6
    • APCSP: 06.7
  • Unit 7: More Complex Control of Execution 

    Eleven Instruction Days at 85 minutes (15 hours)

    0/12

    • U7 Quiz
    • APCSP: 07.1
    • APCSP: 07.2
    • APCSP: 07.3
    • APCSP: 07.4
    • APCSP: 07.5
    • APCSP: 07.6
    • APCSP: 07.7
    • APCSP: 07.8
    • APCSP: 07.9
    • APCSP: 07.10
    • APCSP: 07.11
  • Unit 8: Doing Things Over and Over (Loops) 

    Seven Instruction Days at 85 minutes (10 hours)

    0/8

    • U8 Quiz
    • APCSP: 08.1
    • APCSP: 08.2
    • APCSP: 08.3
    • APCSP: 08.4
    • APCSP: 08.5
    • APCSP: 08.6
    • APCSP: 08.7
  • Unit 9: Grouping Items Together (Lists) 

    10 hours

    0/8

    • U9 Quiz
    • APCSP: 09.1
    • APCSP: 09.2
    • APCSP: 09.3
    • APCSP: 09.4
    • APCSP: 09.5
    • APCSP: 09.6
    • APCSP: 09.7
  • Unit 10: Spreadsheets and Large Data Sets 

    Nine Instruction Days at 85 minutes (12 hours)

    0/10

    • U10 Quiz
    • APCSP: 10.1
    • APCSP: 10.2
    • APCSP: 10.3
    • APCSP: 10.4
    • APCSP: 10.5
    • APCSP: 10.6
    • APCSP: 10.7
    • APCSP: 10.8
    • APCSP: 10.9

Comments are closed

SIDEBAR
»
S
I
D
E
B
A
R
«
»  Substance:WordPress   »  Style:Ahren Ahimsa